MEDIA ADVISORY: “Deconstructing ‘White Supremacy?” discussion at Wayne State, Feb. 20

February 15, 2017


Wayne State University’s Center for Peace and Conflict Studies and The Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights are sponsoring “Deconstructing ‘White Supremacy’?”

The free event will feature the following panelists:

  • Frederic Pearson, professor of political science and director of the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Ronald Brown, associate professor, American government and politics, Department of Political Science
  • Howard Lupovitch, associate professor of history and director of the Cohn-Haddow Center for Judaic Studies
  • Brad Roth, professor of political science and law
  • Liette Gidlow, associate professor, Department of History

Discussion moderated by Barbara L. Jones, community dispute resolution specialist, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies.


During the recent U.S. election season, the notion and characterization of “white supremacy” rose to the fore in public discussion. Some have noted that the concept has characterized this republic from its very founding, while others have openly advocated for and against it. Yet there may be many useful distinctions worth discussing to promote greater understanding of these labels. “White Nationalism,” “White Privilege,” and “White Decline” are among the elements that can be associated with the concept of “supremacy,” and its political fallout, and yet these aspects may carry quite different meanings. Even the basic definition of “whiteness” bears examination.


12:30-2 p.m., Monday, Feb. 20, 2017


Wayne State University David Adamany Undergraduate Library, Bernath Auditorium, 5155 Gullen Mall, Detroit, Michigan 48202.


Barbara Jones:

"The Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, The Detroit Equity Action Lab, and our experts at WSU are poised to facilitate more discussions like this; it's timely. Although conversations like this can or may be difficult, I consider this necessary. Based on the recent election, the topic in itself and various media analysis, we want to examine the subject matter in a historical context, its validity and its effects in a community setting."

Frederic Pearson:

"There can be much confusion about racial implications such as ‘White Supremacy.’ Aspects of these blanket identifiers actually have quite different meanings. Our panel will explore these meanings academically in relation to our public discourse."