Release

Controversial Israeli scholar to speak at Wayne State University: "Is peace possible in Israel/Palestine?"

September 27, 2002


Controversial Israeli scholar, Ilan Pappe, will present a talk titled "The History of Peace-making in Palestine: What is a Fair Solution?" on Monday, Oct. 14, 12:30 p.m. in the Bernath Auditorium of the David Adamany Undergraduate Library, at the Wayne State University campus.

Pappe has written numerous texts on the history of the Arab-Israel Conflict. His two most recent books, "The Modern History of Israel and Palestine" (Cambridge University Press) and "The Middle East in the Twentieth Century" (Routledge), have established him as one of the foremost interpreters of the political scene in the Middle East.

Pappe, a senior lecturer in the Department of Political Science at the University of Haifa, Israel, holds a Ph.D. from Oxford University. His critical post-Zionist analysis of the origins of the state of Israel and the impact this had on Palestinians has prompted some controversy within Israeli academic circles. A recent failed effort to expel him from the University of Haifa was met with international condemnation.

Pappe continues to speak out for peace and justice in the region. He is chair of the Emil Touma Institute for Israeli and Palestinian Studies and the Israeli Association for Multicultural Education.

His appearance on the Wayne State campus is the first public forum to be presented by the Wayne State University Committee for Peace and Justice in the Middle East, a new organization of the academic community at the university. The talk is co-sponsored by the following departments and programs: Near Eastern and Asian Studies, History, Political Science and the Center for Peace and Conflict Studies.

The talk is free and open to the general public. For more information, contact Prof. May Seikaly, 577-6266, ad6006@wayne.edu ;or Prof. Fran Shor, 577-6572f.shor@wayne.edu

Wayne State University is a premier institution of higher education offering more than 350 academic programs through 14 schools and colleges to more than 31,000 students in metropolitan Detroit.